Forest walk

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

AREKU forest photography

3 Responses to “Forest walk

  • Areku,
    You always have such wonderful photos :)
    The first photo with the pathway through the trees gives me a feeling like the path gives off it’s own special energy, like it has a magic or spell on it. As if I were to wander off the path I’d be swallowed up by the darkness hovering over the trees.

    Maybe you could offer some advice on a issue I am having with trying to photograph drawings:
    What would you suggest for someone trying to photograph their art work, but doesn’t have access to a tripod?
    Because I still get fuzzy shots trying to photograph pencil work. The camera picks up the slightest tremble in my hands, which is very easily noticed with drawings with fine lines I noticed. :(

  • Hello!
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts on the photos, that’s one of the reasons that I really enjoy sharing my works!

    My first advice would be to buy a tripod, even the cheapest would do well! However as the question was what to do without one, I’ll give my best advices:
    1. Use as much light as possible. It may be natural light, like shooting near a window, or using artificial lights. Every addition of light brings you a shorter shutter-speed, with in its turn will lessen the risk for trembling impacting the picture.
    2. If possible, use a wider aperture, like f/3,5 or preferably lower. Be aware though that with a lower number you get more light into the sensor/film during a shorter time (which is good) but you need to be more accurate about focusing, as the depth of field decreases with a lower f-stop number.
    3. Use a higher ASA/ISO. The higher the ISO, the more sensitive the sensor/film gets. The negative side is that with higher ISO’s, the grain increases. As a rule of thumb, up to 400-800 iso should be OK on older devices, and on more modern 1600 will be fully acceptable. But with good light, around 2-400 will be more than enough.

    I hope this helped, and if not get back to me, and I’ll see if I can help you further!

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